Tag: Dental treatment

Tag: Dental treatment

Dental implants in Poland

Significant savings

Due to the cost in the UK, many Brits decide to have their dental implants in Poland where they can save up to 70% on UK prices.

Popular dental implants in Poland

All-on-4 / All-on-6 – This is a popular procedure in Poland where 4-to-6 dental implants are placed in the upper or lower jaw bone to serve as a support for a permanently fixed (non-removable) ceramic bridge made of 10-14 custom-made ceramic crowns.

What is a dental implant?

A dental implant is a surgical component that interfaces with the bone of the jaw or skull. It supports a dental prosthesis such as a crown, bridge, denture, facial prosthesis or to act as an orthodontic anchor. It is a fairly complicated and lengthy procedure requiring a minimum of two visits so you should bear this in mind when having your dental implants in Poland.

Osseointegration

The basis for modern dental implants is a biologic process called osseointegration, in which materials such as titanium form an intimate bond to bone.

The implant fixture is first placed so that it is likely to osseointegrate, then a dental prosthetic is added. A variable amount of healing time is required for osseointegration before either the dental prosthetic (a tooth, bridge or denture) is attached to the implant or an abutment is placed which will hold a dental prosthetic.



Success or failure

Success or failure of implants depends on the health of the person receiving the treatment, drugs which affect the chances of osseointegration, and the health of the tissues in the mouth.

The amount of stress that will be put on the implant and fixture during normal function is also evaluated. Planning the position and number of implants is key to the long-term health of the prosthetic since biomechanical forces created during chewing can be significant.

Positioning

The position of implants is determined by the position and angle of adjacent teeth, by lab simulations or by using computed tomography with CAD/CAM simulations and surgical guides called stents. The prerequisites for long-term success of osseointegrated dental implants are healthy bone and gingiva. Since both can atrophy after tooth extraction, pre-prosthetic procedures such as sinus lifts or gingival grafts are sometimes required to recreate ideal bone and gingiva.

Fixed or removable

The final prosthetic can be either fixed, where a person cannot remove the denture or teeth from their mouth, or removable, where they can remove the prosthetic. In each case an abutment is attached to the implant fixture. Where the prosthetic is fixed, the crown, bridge or denture is fixed to the abutment either with lag screws or with dental cement. Where the prosthetic is removable, a corresponding adapter is placed in the prosthetic so that the two pieces can be secured together.



Risks & complications

The risks and complications related to implant therapy divide into those that occur during surgery (such as excessive bleeding or nerve injury), those that occur in the first six months (such as infection and failure to osseointegrate) and those that occur long-term (such as peri-implantitis and mechanical failures).

In the presence of healthy tissues, a well-integrated implant with appropriate biomechanical loads can have 5-year plus survival rates from 93 to 98 percent and 10 to 15 year lifespans for the prosthetic teeth. Long-term studies show a 16- to 20-year success (implants surviving without complications or revisions) between 52% and 76%, with complications occurring up to 48% of the time.

Medical uses

The primary use of dental implants is to support dental prosthetics. Modern dental implants make use of osseointegration, the biologic process where bone fuses tightly to the surface of specific materials such as titanium and some ceramics. The integration of implant and bone can support physical loads for decades without failure.

For individual tooth replacement, an implant abutment is first secured to the implant with an abutment screw. A crown (the dental prosthesis) is then connected to the abutment with dental cement, a small screw, or fused with the abutment as one piece during fabrication. Dental implants, in the same way, can also be used to retain a multiple tooth dental prosthesis either in the form of a fixed bridge or removable dentures.

An implant supported bridge (or fixed denture) is a group of teeth secured to dental implants so the prosthetic cannot be removed by the user. Bridges typically connect to more than one implant and may also connect to teeth as anchor points. Typically the number of teeth will outnumber the anchor points with the teeth that are directly over the implants referred to as abutments and those between abutments referred to as pontics.

Implant supported bridges attach to implant abutments in the same way as a single tooth implant replacement. A fixed bridge may replace as few as two teeth (also known as a fixed partial denture) and may extend to replace an entire arch of teeth (also known as a fixed full denture). In both cases, the prosthesis is said to be fixed because it cannot be removed by the denture wearer.

A removable implant supported denture (also an implant supported overdenture) is a type of dental prosthesis which is not permanently fixed in place. The dental prosthesis can be disconnected from the implant abutments with finger pressure by the wearer. To enable this, the abutment is shaped as a small connector (a button, ball, bar or magnet) which can be connected to analogous adapters in the underside of the dental prosthesis. Facial prosthetics, used to correct facial deformities (e.g. from cancer treatment or injuries) can use connections to implants placed in the facial bones. Depending on the situation the implant may be used to retain either a fixed or removable prosthetic that replaces part of the face.

TADs

In orthodontics, small diameter dental implants, referred to as Temporary Anchorage Devices (or TADs) can assist tooth movement by creating anchor points from which forces can be generated. For teeth to move, a force must be applied to them in the direction of the desired movement. The force stimulates cells in the periodontal ligament to cause bone remodeling, removing bone in the direction of travel of the tooth and adding it to the space created. In order to generate a force on a tooth, an anchor point (something that will not move) is needed.

Since implants do not have a periodontal ligament, and bone remodelling will not be stimulated when tension is applied, they are ideal anchor points in orthodontics. Typically, implants designed for orthodontic movement are small and do not fully osseointegrate, allowing easy removal following treatment.

Composition

A typical conventional implant consists of a titanium screw (resembling a tooth root) with a roughened or smooth surface. The majority of dental implants are made out of commercially pure titanium, which is available in four grades depending upon the amount of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and iron contained.

Implantologist in Poland

There are many dental clinics in Poland that specialise in dental implants. To begin your search, click on the button below.



FAQs about Dental Implants

How much are dental implants in Poland?

Prices vary from clinic to clinic; however as a general guide: A single tooth implant in Poland will cost from £550, the cost in the UK is around £2,000. Full mouth implants in the UK are £7,000 – £28,000, in Poland the cost is £4,000 to £9,000.

What are All-on-4 dental implants?

All-on-4 is a procedure where 4 dental implants, depending on bone availability (i.e. volume, density, etc.) are placed in the upper or lower jaw bone to serve as a support for a permanently fixed ceramic bridge made of 10-14 custom-made ceramic crowns.

How much do All-on-4-dental implants cost in Poland?

All-on-4 dental implants cost from £5200 – £7000 in Poland. In the UK, the cost is from £9500 – £16000.

Are dental implants removable?

The final prosthetic can be either fixed, where a person cannot remove the denture or teeth from their mouth, or removable, where they can remove the prosthetic.

What are the risks with dental implants?

The risks and complications related to implant therapy divide into those that occur during surgery (such as excessive bleeding or nerve injury), those that occur in the first six months (such as infection and failure to osseointegrate) and those that occur long-term (such as peri-implantitis and mechanical failures).

How long do dental implants last?

In the presence of healthy tissues, a well-integrated implant with appropriate biomechanical loads can have 5-year plus survival rates from 93 to 98 percent and 10 to 15 year lifespans for the prosthetic teeth. Long-term studies show a 16- to 20-year success (implants surviving without complications or revisions) between 52% and 76%, with complications occurring up to 48% of the time. Many dentists conservatively estimate that implants will last about 25 years.

What is osseointegration?

The basis for modern dental implants is a biologic process called osseointegration, in which materials such as titanium form an intimate bond to bone. The implant fixture is first placed so that it is likely to osseointegrate, then a dental prosthetic is added. A variable amount of healing time is required for osseointegration before either the dental prosthetic (a tooth, bridge or denture) is attached to the implant or an abutment is placed which will hold a dental prosthetic.


Fly to Poland – Airlines and airports

Gateway to Poland

Most of Europe’s major airlines fly to and from Poland. Poland’s national carrier is LOT and there are a number of budget airlines that fly to Poland including WizzAirEasyJetEurowings, Norwegian and Ryanair.

Flying to Poland

International airlines fly mainly into Warsaw (WAW), the country’s largest gateway. Other major airports offering passenger service include: Warsaw-Modlin (WMI)Kraków (KRK)Katowice (KTW)Gdańsk (GDN)Poznań (POZ)Wrocław (WRO)Szczecin (SZZ)Rzeszów (RZE)Bydgoszcz (BZG)Łódź (LCJ)Lublin (LUZ)Olsztyn (SZY) and Zielona Góra (IEG).

At Dentists in Poland, we do not operate a flight booking service. Experience has taught us that it is more practical for patients to book their own flights around the dates of their dental treatment.

Dentists in Poland is sponsored by Love Poland who operate a group of Facebook pages dedicated to promoting the country – the culture, the lifestyle, the places, the people and much more.

On these pages, you will find lots of interesting information about Poland in general and 3 of these pages are location specific covering WarsawKrakow and Gdansk.

There are frequent flights to the airports in Poland so it will not be a problem to book flights around the dates of your dental treatment.

At Dentists in Poland, we focus on matching patients with the best dentists and dental clinics within the major cities in Poland. We currently help dental patients from the UK to find treatments in WarsawKrakow & Gdańsk; however we will be expanding into other cities soon.


Reasons to have dental treatment in Poland

Dental tourism Poland

This article is short and below you will see how long it will take to read it.

Time needed: 5 minutes.

There are many good reasons to have dental treatment in Poland, here’s our Top 7.

  1. Safe, Professional & Modern

    Poland provides a wide and full range of safe and professional dental treatments. Many of the dental clinics are modern and equipped with the latest high tech including Digital X-ray Diagnostics, Panoramic Radiograph & Computed Tomography (CT).

  2. Qualified dentists

    Education of dentists in Poland is high and regulation is strict. To become a qualified dentist in Poland, students must first undergo five years of training at university. After completing their five-year course, graduates begin a 12-month work experience program. During this time they are only able to perform treatments under supervision. Following this, they must pass another exam in order to become fully qualified. Many dentists undertake dental specialties training after their qualification.

  3. English speaking

    Many dentists in Poland speak English fluently particularly in the main cities; so there will be no communication barriers. In addition, many dental clinics have high tech equipment which allows them to effectively communicate treatment to their patients via visualisation.

  4. Prices

    Going to the dentist in the UK is expensive with average costs of just one implant being £2,400 and one porcelain veneer starting at £500. If you require a lot of dental work, the final price can run into tens of thousands of £s. Dental tourism to Poland exists for one main reason, dental treatment is significantly cheaper here. A dental implant with a crown will typically cost around £900 and other treatments can be up to 70% cheaper even with the extra cost of flights and accommodation to consider.

  5. Travel time

    Poland is easy to get to from the UK, there are many convenient flight connections and many budget airlines. Flight times average just 2.5 hours from the UK. International airlines fly mainly into Warsaw (WAW), the country’s largest gateway. Other major airports offering passenger service include: Warsaw-Modlin, Kraków, Katowice, Gdańsk, Poznań, Wrocław, Szczecin, Rzeszów, Bydgoszcz, Łódź, Lublin, Olsztyn and Zielona Góra.

  6. Poland is an amazing place

    Poland is a very popular tourist destination, particularly the main cities of Warsaw, Krakow & Gdansk where many of our recommended dental surgeries are located. However there is much more to Poland than just the amazing cities. From Poland’s lake district Masuria with over 2,000 lakes to true wilderness areas like The Bialowieza Forest to the stunning Tatra Mountains – you will find that Poland has something to offer every visitor.

  7. Culture, food & drink

    Polish culture is closely connected with its intricate 1000 year history and it is fascinating. The food is delicious and the beers and vodkas are wonderful and the icing on the cake – everything is much cheaper than in the UK.


7 Reasons for Dental Treatment in Poland

For information about tourist areas and attractions in Poland, please visit our Discover Poland page. Alternatively, please visit the Facebook page of our main sponsor, Love Poland. There, you will find lots of information about the country including some great images, things to do and see and articles about culture and the people who live here.


Dental treatment explained

Major public health problems

Dental treatment usually encompasses practices related to the oral cavity and is often referred to as dentistry. According to the World Health Organisation, oral diseases are major public health problems. This is due to their high incidence and prevalence across the globe, with the disadvantaged affected more than other socio-economic groups.

Dental treatment

The majority of dental treatment in Poland carried out today is to prevent or treat the two most common oral diseases. These are dental caries (tooth decay) and periodontal disease (gum disease or pyorrhea). Common treatments involve the restoration of teeth, extraction or surgical removal of teeth, scaling and root planing and endodontic root canal treatment.

Dental treatment in Poland

Education of dentists in Poland is high and regulation is strict. To become a qualified dentist in Poland, students must first undergo five years of training at university. After completing their five-year course, graduates begin a 12-month work experience program. During this time they are only able to perform treatments under supervision. Following this, they must pass another exam in order to become fully qualified.

By nature of their general training they can carry out the majority of dental treatments such as restorative (fillings, crowns, bridges), prosthetic (dentures), endodontic (root canal) therapy, periodontal (gum) therapy, and extraction of teeth. In addition to this – performing examinations, radiographs (x-rays), and diagnosis. Dentists can also prescribe medications such as antibiotics, sedatives, and any other drugs used in patient management.

Many dentists undertake dental specialties training after their qualification such as Implantology which is replacing extracted teeth with dental implants.

Dentists also encourage prevention of oral diseases through proper hygiene and regular, twice yearly, checkups for professional cleaning and evaluation.

Oral infections and inflammations may affect overall health and conditions in the oral cavity may be indicative of systemic diseases, such as osteoporosis, diabetes, celiac disease or cancer.

See further information about the range of dental treatment available.

Oral-Systemic Health

Many studies have also shown that gum disease is associated with an increased risk of diabetes, heart disease, and preterm birth. The concept that oral health can affect systemic health and disease is referred to as “oral-systemic health”.


Dental specialties

Dental qualification in Poland

To become a qualified dentist in Poland, students must first undergo five years of training at university prior to beginning dental specialties training.

After completing their five-year course, graduates begin a 12-month work experience program. During this time they are only able to perform treatments under supervision.

Following this, they must pass another exam in order to become fully qualified.

Dental specialties training

Many dentists undertake dental specialties training after their qualification. Examples of specialities include:

  • Anesthesiology – How to relieve pain through advanced use of local and general anesthetic techniques.
  • Dental public health – Epidemiology and social health policies relevant to oral health.
  • Conservative dentistry and endodontics – Restoring the tooth form and function when destructed by carious and non carious lesions affecting the teeth, before involvement of pulp or root canal is termed as conservative dentistry. When the root canal are involved, the speciality is known as endodontics.
  • Endodontics (also called endodontology) – Root canal therapy and study of diseases of the dental pulp and periapical tissues.
  • Forensic odontology – Gathering and use of dental evidence in law. This may be performed by any dentist with experience or training in this field. The function of the forensic dentist is primarily documentation and verification of identity.
  • Geriatric dentistry or Geriodontics – The delivery of dental care to older adults involving the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of problems associated with normal aging and age-related diseases as part of an interdisciplinary team with other health care professionals.
  • Oral and maxillofacial pathology – The study, diagnosis, and sometimes the treatment of oral and maxillofacial related diseases.
  • Oral and maxillofacial radiology – Radiologic interpretation of oral and maxillofacial diseases.
  • Maxillofacial surgery (also called oral surgery) – Extractions, implants, and surgery of the jaws, mouth and face.
  • Oral biology – Research in dental and craniofacial biology.
  • Implantology – Replacing extracted teeth with dental implants.
  • Oral medicine – The clinical evaluation and diagnosis of oral mucosal diseases.
  • Orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics – Straightening of teeth and modification of midface and mandibular growth.
  • Pediatric dentistry (also called pedodontics) – Dentistry for children.
  • Periodontology (also called periodontics) – The study and treatment of diseases of the periodontium (non-surgical and surgical) as well as placement and maintenance of dental implants.
  • Prosthodontics (also called prosthetic dentistry) – Dentures, bridges and the restoration of implants. Some prosthodontists further their training in “oral and maxillofacial prosthodontics”, which is the discipline concerned with the replacement of missing facial structures, such as ears, eyes, noses, etc.
  • Special needs dentistry (also called special care dentistry) – Dentistry for those with developmental and acquired disabilities.
  • Veterinary dentistry, a speciality of veterinary medicine – The field of dentistry applied to the care of animals.

The training to become a specialist dentist in Poland is very high and does not come without cost to health and well-being. Dentists are prone to many health problems and often spend a considerable portion of their career in pain and discomfort. Read this article about the Hazards in modern dentistry for further information.

For information about dentistry in Poland, The Polish Chamber of Physicians and Dentists is a good source!