Category: Travel

Category: Travel

Worldwide Locations

We believe that it is the right of every individual to have access to affordable high quality dental care & via our partner, Dental Departures, we can provide a world of dental care. For less. Check out our worldwide locations below.

Dental care is expensive. We know by personal experience that patients can receive quality dental care at a fraction of the cost by travelling overseas. To achieve this goal, Dental Departures are building the largest global dental marketplace: to bring customers together with high quality global dental providers.

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Where are the most popular destinations?

Indonesia – 50 clinics – Find a dental clinic in Indonesia

Costa Rica – 122 clinics – Find a dental clinic in Costa Rica

Colombia – 113 clinics – Find a dental clinic in Colombia

Hungary – 49 clinics – Find a dental clinic in Hungary

Malaysia – 147 clinics – Find a dental clinic in Malaysia

Mexico – 836 clinics – Find a dental clinic in Mexico

Philippines – 114 clinics – Find a dental clinic in Philippines

Spain – 125 clinics – Find a dental clinic in Spain

Thailand – 215 clinics – Find a dental clinic in Thailand

Turkey – 169 clinics – Find a dental clinic in Turkey

Vietnam – 172 clinics – Find a dental clinic in Vietnam

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Malbork Castle

Past home of The Teutonic Order

Malbork is a town in northern Poland which is popular because of the medieval Malbork Castle founded in the 13th century by the Knights of the Teutonic Order.

Largest Gothic fortress in Europe

The Teutonic Order was founded around the year 1190 in Palestine to crusade against the Muslims and pagans. In the early 14th century the Teutonic Knights moved their capital from Venice to Malbork on the Nogat River, which is now in northern Poland. The most significant trace of the their presence in the town is the imposing red brick castle from 1274 on the river bank, and it is the largest Gothic fortress in Europe.

Under continuous construction for nearly 230 years, the Malbork Castle complex is actually three castles nested in one another. A classic example of a medieval fortress, it is the world’s largest brick castle and one of the most impressive of its kind in Europe.

World War II

The castle was in the process of being restored when World War II broke out. During the war, the castle was over 50% destroyed. Restoration has been ongoing since the war. However, the main cathedral in the castle, fully restored just prior to the war and destroyed during the war, remains in its ruined state. The castle and its museum are listed as UNESCO’s World Heritage Sites.

Third Reich

With the rise of Adolf Hitler to power in the early 1930s the Nazis began using the site for annual pilgrimages by both the Hitler Youth and the League of German Girls. It was the Teutonic Castle at Marienburg, Malbork that served as the blue print for the Order Castles of the Third Reich.

Defensive Walls

Malbork Castle is encircled by defensive walls with gates and towers. The Grand Master’s palace is believed to be the top achievement of the late-Gothic style. The representative summer refectory is the most attractive chamber in the castle interiors.

Useful links

The Malbork Castle Museum

Unesco

Dental tourism

Malbork castle is only 62 km from Gdansk where many high quality dental clinics are located. The easiest way to get to Malbork Castle from Gdansk is by train. From Gdansk Glowny, the main train station in Gdansk, it can take between 28 and 55 minutes to get to Malbork Castle, depending upon the type of train you choose.


Top 10 tourist attractions in Poland

Where to go, what to see!

This article – Top 10 tourist attractions in Poland – is medium in size and below you will see how long it will take to read it.

Time needed: 12 minutes.

From Poland’s lake district Masuria with over 2,000 lakes to true wilderness areas like The Bialowieza Forest to the stunning Tatra Mountains – you will find that Poland has something to offer every visitor.  Here’s our Top 10 recommended tourist attractions in Poland:

  1. Auschwitz

    It is widely agreed that everyone should visit Auschwitz at least once in their lives, it is a stern reminder of the horrors that human beings can inflict on each other and for some people, a life-changing experience. Auschwitz was a network of concentration and extermination camps built and operated in occupied Poland by Nazi Germany during the Second World War. Auschwitz is the German name for Oświęcim, the town the camps were located in and around; it was renamed by the Germans after they invaded Poland in September 1939 – Further information

    Auschwitz

  2. Wieliczka Salt Mine

    The Wieliczka Salt Mine, located in the town of Wieliczka in southern Poland, lies within the Krakow metropolitan area. The mine continuously produced table salt from the 13th century until 2007 as one of the world’s oldest operating salt mines. The mine’s attractions for tourists include dozens of statues and an entire chapel that have been carved out of the rock salt by the miners. About 1.2 million persons visit the Wieliczka Salt Mine annually – Further information

    Wieliczka Salt Mine

  3. Zakopane

    Zakopane is a town in southern Poland. The location is informally known as “the Winter Capital of Poland,” and lies in the southern part of the Podhale region at the foot of the Tatra Mountains, the only alpine mountain range in the Carpathian Mountains. It is the most important Polish center of mountaineering and skiing, and is visited annually by some three million tourists – Further information

    Zakopane

  4. Tricity

    Tricity (also Tri-City) is an urban area consisting of three Polish cities: Gdańsk, Gdynia and Sopot. They are situated adjacent to one other, in a row, on the coast of the Gdańsk Bay, Baltic Sea, in Eastern Pomerania, northern Poland. There’s plenty to do around Tricity, there are lots of tourist attractions and a lively nightlife scene not to mention all the fun of the seaside! Either enjoy sunbathing or take part in any of the many watersport activities on offer. From theatre to Rock concerts to quality restaurants, its all available in the Tricity area – Further information

    Beach holidays

  5. Tatra Mountains

    The Tatras are the highest mountain range in the Carpathian Mountains. Although considerably smaller than the Alps, they are classified as having an alpine landscape. Their high mountain character, combined with great accessibility, makes them popular with tourists and scientists. The area is a well-known winter sports area and includes the resort of Zakopane, the “Winter Capital” of Poland – Further information

    Tatra Mountains

  6. Czestochowa

    Czestochowa is a city in south Poland on the Warta River. It lies among the picturesque Jurassic rocks of Krakow Czestochowa Upland, topped with the ruins of Medieval castles. The town is known for the famous Pauline monastery of Jasna Góra that is the home of the Black Madonna painting, a shrine to the Virgin Mary. Every year, millions of pilgrims from all over the world come to Częstochowa to see it – Further information

    Black Madonna

  7. Masuria

    Masuria is an area in northeastern Poland famous today for its many thousands of lakes. Today, the region’s economy relies largely on eco-tourism and agriculture. The lakes offer varieties of water sports such as sailing and holiday activities. The whole area has become a prime destination for yachtspeople and canoeists, and is also popular among anglers, hikers, bikers and nature-lovers – Further information

    Masuria

  8. Kashubia

    Kashubia is a lake district in North Poland. It is surrounded by many hills made by Scandinavian glaciers. Among larger cities, Gdynia contains the largest proportion of people declaring Kashubian origin. However, the biggest city of the Kashubia region is Gdańsk, the capital of the Pomeranian Voivodeship and the traditional capital of Kashubia – Further information

    Kashubia

  9. Bieszczady Mountains

    The Bieszczady Mountains are pleasantly devoid of the trappings of mass tourism and offer visitors the opportunity to discover the, ‘Wild East’ without venturing into Ukraine or the Soviet Union. The scenery in the region is wild and rugged and includes flora such as the Dacian Violet, Carpathian Beech and the Hungarian Violet, all species which cannot be seen further West. The wildlife in the area include bears, lynx, beavers, wolves, European bison and red mountain deer – Further information

    Bieszczady Mountains

  10. Wolf’s Lair

    Wolf’s Lair in Poland is the standard English name for Wolfsschanze, Adolf Hitler’s first World War II Eastern Front military headquarters, one of several Führerhauptquartier (Führer Headquarters) or FHQs located in various parts of Europe. The complex was blown up and abandoned on 25 January 1945, but many of the bunkers were so thick that their damaged walls and ceilings remain – Further information

    Wolf's Lair


How to use this website?

Time needed: 2 hours.

The Dentists in Poland directory has been designed to make dental tourism to Poland as easy as possible. These are the suggested steps about how to use this website.

  1. Compare the costs

    Once you have a cost for your dental treatment in the UK, research the cost of this treatment in Poland – you will find a handy guide on our Price comparisons page. If you can make a significant saving (usually 50% – 70%), proceed to the step 2.

  2. Decide where you would like to visit in Poland

    At Dentists in Poland, we focus on matching patients with the best dentists and dental clinics within the major cities in Poland. We currently help dental patients from the UK to find treatments in WarsawKrakowGdańsk & Wrocław; however we will be expanding into other cities soon. These 4 cities are the most popular destinations for dental tourism in Poland. You will find lots of tourist information within our Discover Poland section.

  3. Use our website to find out how long your dental treatment will take

    Some treatments require more than one visit to the dentist. You will find this information on our Dental treatment page.

  4. Check the costs of flights and accommodation for your visit

    You will find information about flying to Poland on this page – Fly to Poland – Airlines and airports. Most of Europe’s major airlines fly to and from Poland. Poland’s national carrier is LOT and there are a number of budget airlines that fly to Poland including WizzAirEasyJetEurowings, Norwegian and Ryanair. Some dental clinics provide accommodation as part of a package so it is worthwhile spending time looking through our directory – you may find a good deal!

  5. Find a dentist

    Use our directory to find your dentist. We have made this easy for you by listing the Top 20 in each location and making sure that they speak English and provide information in English via their websites or via a page on this website. Make a shortlist and contact each one directly to discuss your treatment.

  6. Book your treatment, flights & accommodation

    Remember that if you are staying in Poland for a few days, you may wish to explore the country between treatments.

Tricity Poland

Gdańsk, Gdynia and Sopot

Tricity (also Tri-City) is an urban area consisting of three Polish cities: Gdańsk, Gdynia and Sopot. They are situated adjacent to one other, in a row, on the coast of the Gdańsk Bay, Baltic Sea, in Eastern Pomerania, northern Poland.

Wealth

The area is home to some of Poland’s wealthiest people. Nearly 35% of taxpayers from Tricity are in the middle and high taxable income groups (average for Poland 10%). Approximately 12% of Tricity taxpayers are in highest taxable income group (Polish average 3%).

Tourism in Tricity

There’s plenty to do around Tricity, there are lots of tourist attractions and a lively nightlife scene not to mention all the fun of the seaside! Either enjoy sunbathing or take part in any of the many watersport activities on offer. From theatre to Rock concerts to quality restaurants, its all available in the Tricity area.

You will find some well-known events in Gdansk, in particular International Pop festivals such as the Heineken Opener Festival.

Sopot

Sopot has a great geographical location – lying between the beautiful woods of the Tricity Landscape Park, and the numerous sand beaches of the Bay of Gdańsk. Sopot is known for the endless quantities of tourists, who mainly visit the city during the summertime.

Monte Casino Street (ul. Bohaterów Monte Cassino) is the center of Sopot, a pedestrianised promenade. On both sides of the street there are countless XIX – XXth-century houses, some of them housing pubs or restaurants today.

To discover the real charm of the town, turn into one of Monte Casino’s side streets, where you’re bound to admire numerous art nouveau houses, parks and gardens. One such beautiful street shelters the splendid Sierakowskich Court (Dworek Sierakowskich).

At the end of Monte Casino you’ll find the Wooden Pier (Molo). It is the longest wooden pier in Europe. During the summertime, for a small fee you can enter the pier, and admire the coastline. You’ll enjoy the sight of the Grand Hotel (one of the largest and most impressive in the Tri-City) on one side, and the Zhong Hua Chinese Hotel on the other, where the Łazienki Południowe (Southern Baths) used to be.

In summer, there are jazz concerts on the hotel’s terrace every Thursday. Another destination for a long walk are the Castle Hill Caves, Sopot’s oldest historic site and the only monument of this kind located in the center of a contemporary European city.

Each August Sopot plays host to the annual International Sopot Song Festival. The Opera Lesna in the heart of the Tri-City forest is where you can watch and listen to the best artists arriving in Sopot and still feel the special atmosphere of this magic place.

Today Sopot bustles with cafes, bars, restaurants and clubs. Nightlife and countless summer events is what makes this city so popular. So let yourself be mesmerized by this remarkable resort where you will surely find something for yourself.

Gdynia

Gdynia is a young, but quickly expanding port situated right by the seashore, offering many tourist attractions as well as splendid shopping opportunities and a lot of entertainment.

The city was founded as a Polish harbor in 1926. Because of its unusual location, you will easily catch great views of the sea and beautiful scenery, and also find long promenades, beautiful waterfronts, marinas and yacht clubs. Gdynia is the only city in Poland and one of the few in Europe to pride itself on such a long and accessible seashore.

The city has a good transportation system, so you won’t have any problems reaching Gdynia from either of the other cities.

Kosciuszki square (Skwer Kościuszki) is the sightseeing center of Gdynia. The ships moored in the dockyards , like the ORP Błyskawica destroyer (“Lightning”) or Dar Pomorza (the Pomeranian Gift) for instance, are the biggest tourist attractions.

The beach in Gdynia hosts ‘the Summer Theatre Stage’. So if you are a theatre lover you should definitely see one of the most interesting plays of the season.

Gdańsk

Gdańsk is Poland’s principal seaport as well as the capital of the Pomeranian Voivodeship. It is also historically the largest city of the Kashubian region.

The city is close to the former boundary between West Slavic and Germanic lands and it has a complex political history with periods of Polish rule, periods of German rule, and two spells as a free city. It has been part of modern Poland since 1945.

Walking in the city and getting to know its history etched in the monuments will give you many magical moments and true emotions. Gdansk is a pearl of bourgeois architecture, boasting beautiful houses and a unique market. It is a world of cozy streets and historical churches. These are also perfectly preserved fortifications, ranked among the biggest in Europe, and interesting harbour architecture.

10 Interesting Facts about Tricity

  1. Gdańsk is known and has been known as Danzig, Gdania, Gyddanyzc, Kdanzk, Gdanzc, Danceke, Danzc, Danczk, Danczik, Danczig and Gdąnsk amongst others!
  2. Gdańsk was the birthplace of the Solidarity movement which, under the leadership of political activist Lech Wałęsa, played a major role in bringing an end to Communist rule across Central Europe.
  3. Gdańsk has been around a long time. It was founded in 997.
  4. Sopot Pier is the longest in the Baltic at 640 metres.
  5. The area around Gdansk is famous for Amber which is also known by many other names such as: jantar, good stone, sacred stone, gold of the north, Baltic gold, and electron. Amber is also a mineral of many colours. Depending on the age amber nuggets range from nearly white, through all shades of yellow and orange, to dark, almost cherry-like red.
  6. Gdansk is the sixth-largest city in Poland.
  7. The Gdańsk Crane (a popular tourist attraction) was the largest port crane in Medieval Europe.
  8. Gdańsk is situated at the mouth of the Motława River, connected to the Leniwka, a branch in the delta of the nearby Vistula River, whose waterway system supplies 60% of the area of Poland and connects Gdańsk to the national capital in Warsaw.
  9. The name Gdańsk is thought to originate from the Gdania River, the original name of the Motława branch on which the city is situated.
  10. For much of its history, the majority of the inhabitants of Gdańsk were German-speakers, who called it Danzig. This name was also used in English until the end of World War II, and is still used in historical contexts. Other former English spellings of the name include Dantzig, Dantsic and Dantzic.

Christmas in Warsaw

How Christmas should be

A good time to consider having your dental treatment in Warsaw is over the festive period. Christmas in Warsaw is very special and you will find an abundance of Christmas fairs or markets. You will also find that the dental clinics are less busy at this time of the year.

Christmas fairs & markets

Starting in December you’ll find impromptu markets setting up on the plac Defilad, in front of the Palace of Culture and Science and the plac Zamkowy, by the castle.

These fairs and markets are definitely worth a visit and will make you feel like a child on Christmas Eve again! The best time to come to Warsaw if you want to enjoy the Christmas markets is in the second or third weekend of December.

Old Town Christmas Market

The much beloved Christmas Market returns to Warsaw’s Old Town starting at the end of November. The Market Square is filled with wooden stalls selling handicrafts (Christmas ornaments, amber jewellery, ceramics, carved wood decorations, and more), traditional food, mulled wine, and hot beer. A simple, but essential Warsaw winter pleasure!

The Christmas street lighting in Warsaw around the Old Town and along the Royal Route is just beautiful!

Warsaw is an excellent location to visit during Christmas and just perfect for picking up that original and unique Christmas present at a good price too! The best time to come to Warsaw for Christmas shopping is the last two weeks in November. Unlike the UK, this is when the shopping malls first get decorated for Christmas and you will enjoy the Christmas ambiance without the mad crowds during this time.

Polish Christmas

Christmas in Poland is taken very seriously and is mainly focused on family and friends. During Advent, families get busy baking Christmas piernik (gingerbread) and start making (yes making!) their Christmas decorations. Gingerbread is made in a variety of shapes including hearts, animals and St. Nicholas figures (St. Nick is the Polish version of Santa).

Traditional decorations include the pajaki, which are handmade stars and decorated eggshells.

Lit Christmas trees are placed in most public areas, outside churches and in homes. Traditionally the trees are decorated with shiny apples, walnuts, wrapped chocolate shapes, hand blown glass baubles, and many homemade ornaments and candles. On the top of the tree is a star or a glittering top piece. In many homes, sparklers are hung on the branches of the trees for ambiance.

Gwiazdory

During Advent the “Gwiazdory,” or star carriers, wander through the towns and villages and this continues until Epiphany. Some of the Gwiazdory sing carols; others recite verses or put on “Szopki” (puppet shows), or “herody” (nativity scenes). The last two customs are developments from traditional manger scenes or “Jaselka” (crib).

Oplatek

One tradition unique to Poland is the sharing of the “oplatek”, a thin wafer into which is pressed a holy picture. People once carried these oplatki from house to house wishing their neighbors a Merry Christmas. Nowadays, the bread is mostly shared with members of the family and immediate neighbors.

As each person shares pieces of the wafer with another person, they are supposed to forgive any hurts that have occurred over the past year and to wish the other person all the happiness in the coming year.

Christmas Eve in Poland

In Poland, Christmas Eve is a day first of fasting, then of feasting. The feast begins with the appearance of the first star; there is no meat in the feast, and it is followed by the exchange of gifts. The following day is often spent visiting friends. In Polish tradition, people combine religion and family closeness at Christmas time.

Although gift giving plays a major role in the rituals, emphasis is placed more on making special foods and decorations. On Christmas Eve, so important is the first star of the night that it has been given the affectionate name of “little star” or Gwiazdka, in remembrance of the Star of Bethlehem. On that night, all watch the sky anxiously, hoping to be the first to cry out, “The star!” The moment the star appears, people start eating.

Wigilia

Families unite for the most carefully planned meal of the year, Wigilia, the Christmas supper. The Wigilia derives its name from the Latin word vigilare, which means “to watch” or keep vigil. According to tradition, bits of hay are spread beneath the tablecloth as a reminder that Christ was born in a manger. An even number of people must be seated around the table or, tradition states, someone may die in the coming year. Wigilia is a family feast. In some places an empty place setting is symbolically left at the table for the Baby Jesus or for a wanderer who may be in need, or if a deceased relative should come and would like to share in the meal.

The meal begins with the breaking of the oplatek. Everyone at the table breaks off a piece and eats it as a symbol of their unity with Christ. They then share a piece with each family member giving good wishes for the following year. There should be twelve dishes, as a symbol of the Twelve Apostles, or an odd number of dishes for good luck (usually five, seven, or nine). Poppy seed cake, beet soup, prune dumplings, carp, herring and noodles with poppy seed are universal Polish Christmas foods.

Traditionally, there is no meat eaten on Christmas Eve. Often there is compote of dry fruits. The remainder of the evening is given to stories and songs around the Christmas tree. In some areas of the country, children are taught that “The Little Star” brings the gifts. As presents are wrapped, carolers may walk from house to house, receiving treats along the way.


Kashubia

The Kashubians

Kashubia is a lake district in North Poland. It is surrounded by many hills made by Scandinavian glaciers.

Among larger cities, Gdynia contains the largest proportion of people declaring Kashubian origin. However, the biggest city of the Kashubia region is Gdańsk, the capital of the Pomeranian Voivodeship and the traditional capital of Kashubia.

The traditional occupations of Kashubians were agriculture and fishing; today these are joined by the service and hospitality industry, and agrotourism especially in the so-called Kashubian Switzerland.

Dental tourism in Kashubia

If you are coming to Gdansk for dental treatment, you will be in the Capital of Kashubia and therefore in the perfect location to explore the region.

Kashubians

Kashubians / Kaszubians, also called Kashubs, Kaszubians, Kassubians or Cassubians, are a West Slavic ethnic group. They speak Kashubian, classified either as a language or a Polish dialect.

The total number of Kashubians varies depending on one’s definition. A common estimate is that over 300,000 people in Poland are of the Kashubian ethnicity. The most extreme estimates are as low as 50,000 or as high as 500,000.

The language in Kashubia

In 2005, Kashubian was for the first time made an official subject on the Polish matura exam (roughly equivalent to the English A-Level and French Baccalaureat). Despite an initial uptake of only 23 students, this development was seen as an important step in the official recognition and establishment of the language.

Today, in some towns and villages in northern Poland, Kashubian is the second language spoken after Polish, and it is taught in regional schools.

Since 2005 Kashubian enjoys legal protection in Poland as an official regional language. It is the only tongue in Poland with this status. It was granted by an act of the Polish Parliament on January 6, 2005.

Old Kashubian culture has partially survived in architecture and folk crafts such as pottery, plaiting, embroidery, amber-working, sculpturing and glasspainting.

In 1858 Kashubians emigrated to Upper Canada and created the settlement of Wilno, in Renfrew County, Ontario, which still exists today.

Tourist Attractions

Kashubian Ethnographic Park: At Wdzydze Kiszewskie is an outdoor museum of traditional Kaszubian buildings, founded in 1906. The buildings were collected from the region, lovingly restored and furnished and set up as a folk village. Perhaps some of them were abandoned by the Kaszubs as they left to look for a new life overseas. In the area of 22 hectares there are approximately 40 buildings: 7 farmyards, 2 manor houses, 5 cottages, 4 nobleman houses, a village school with a classroom, a church, a sawmill, a windmill and a smithy.

Centre for Education and Regional Promotion in Szymbark: Danmar is a timber house builder and is dedicated to the preservation and promotion of Kashubian culture. They have on exhibit new and old solid timber houses, even a church, a replica underground bunker as used by the partisans during WWII (Gryf Pomorski), an ‘upside down’ house and a restored steam train as used to transport people to the camps in Siberia. They have the longest plank of sawn wood in the world. It was cut from a Douglas fir measuring 36.83m and can be found in the Guinness Book of Records. Many Polish celebrities were involved in the sawing including Lech Walesa. It is well worth a visit.

Parowozownia (steam locomotive museum) at Koscierzyna: The open air railway museum at Koscierzyna displays a huge collection of steam locomotives and railway stock, dating back to 1929, and documents the development of the railways in the region. You are free to climb onto these huge engines and even ride on a working steam train!

Sand dunes at Leba: Nearby is the Smoldzino and Slowinski National Park, covering more than 18,000 hectares of dune, forest, water and peat environment, and sand-bars separating lakes Lebsko and Gardno from the sea. Here shifting dunes, which can reach a height up to 120m (400 feet), leave wilderness behind them; and one can feel as though in a real desert, Poland’s Sahara, with sand all the way to the horizon.

Hel Peninsula: The sandy Hel Peninsula, 35 km long, is a unique natural and landscape attraction and some call it the longest pier in Europe. The whole of the Hel Peninsula is incorporated into the Seaside Landscape Park (Nadmorski Park Krajobrazowy). On the Hel Peninsula there are the seaside resorts of Kuznica, Jurata and Jastarnia. At it’s furthest point is Hel, a well known fishing port, and the seat of a fishing museum, as well as a reminder of the last Polish bastion in the September 1939 fight with the Nazi invaders.

Malbork Castle: Malbork is the mightiest ot the Teutonic Knights’ fortresses and the capital of their independent state until returned to Poland at the end of the 15th century. It consists of the Upper Castle, the Middle Castle and the Palace of the Grand Master surrounded by common walls and a moat. The main gate has been reconstructed with its portcullis. Inside there is a museum with many artifacts and a great collection of amber jewelery and figures. You may visit either with a group or by yourself. If you want to take pictures, you need to buy a special ticket.

Bytów Castle: The castle was built by the Teutonic Knights at the end of the 14th century. It is now fully restored, part is a hotel, part is the Museum of Kashubia. Here you may see many examples of fine local art and embroidery.

Chmielno: The Museum of Kashubian Pottery of the Necel family in Chmielno is a showcase of the art of pottery making. Under a master’s expert eye, you can even make your own clay pot!

Kashubian Regional Museum in Kartuzy: will introduce you to some of the intricacies of Kashubian domestic, cultural and religious traditions. Kashubians are a very ancient ethnic group of Slavonic Balts. They resisted polonisation for centuries but regard themselves as Poles. After the partitions of Poland, despite systematic germanisation, the Kashubians maintained close ties with Poland. They did not lose their identity, historical heritage or original culture.

The Kaszubski Landscape Park: attracts nature lovers with its nine nature reserves featuring beautiful Pomeranian beech forests and rare specimens of flora and fauna. The Radunia River Gorge, with the river flowing like a mountain stream through a deep ravine, is one of the park’s most attractive views. The striking beauty of the area is the result of the activity of continental glaciers, which carved out deep valleys and created the rivers and lakes.

Ostrich Farm at Garczyno: It was the first Ostrich farm in Poland, founded in 1993. The ostrich count is about 100. You get the chance to taste the scrambled egg made from the ostrich egg, and you can have a ride on the back of camel. There is also another ostrich farm in the village of Wandowo.

Stone Rings Reserve in Wesior: It’s at the cemetery Gotów. There are about 160 graves and four stone circles dating from the beginning of AD. Supposedly, this place influences people and gives them unforgettable impressions.

Kwidzyn: It is worth visiting the 14th century castle and cathedral complex located there, as well as the Recreational Grounds of Milosna (a beautiful complex of buildings dating back from the early 20th century). Here you can also see a mini-Zoo for children. Moreover, while in Kwidzyn, you can enjoy the numerous town attractions, such as: restaurants, sala s, discos, etc.

Anthem Museum: About eight kilometres east of Kościerzyna is the small village of Będomin. There is the 18th century court which is surrounded with a park of three hundred years old linden and oaks. This court has belonged to Józef Wybicki’s family for many years. The museum has been open since 1798, and it’s the only Anthem Museum in the world.

Sianowo: features a wooden church built in 1816.

Wiezyca: a viewing tower offering fantastic views and three ski slopes.

Szymbark: where you can enjoy horse and cart rides and where sleigh rides are organised (snow permitting!)

Golubie: very famous for its beautiful botanical gardens.


Beach holidays in Poland

At the seaside

One of the most popular dental tourism destinations in Poland during the Summer is Tri-City consisting of three cities in Pomerania: Gdansk, Gdynia and Sopot. They are situated adjacent to each other on the coast of Gdańsk Bay next to the Baltic Sea and are therefore ideal for beach holidays.

Dental Tourism

Gdansk is particular boasts many modern dental clinics equipped with the latest dentistry technologies and dentists and staff that are highly qualified, experienced and speak English – read more

Ideal for beach holidays

Poland has miles upon miles of golden sandy coastline and some of the biggest sand dunes in Europe. That topped with hot summers, well above the average for Europe, makes Poland an ideal beach holiday destination.

If you dream of a holidays on a beach, just imagine the over 700 km long golden strip that is the Polish seaside. The northern border of Poland is the Baltic, and most of the coastline is a beach. July and August are the best months for sunbathing at the Polish seaside.

Summertime sees the Polish seaside come to life and the most popular beach resorts attract many holidaymakers searching for sun and relaxation. Apart from the excellent beaches, holiday resorts on the Baltic Sea also boast historically captivating cities, great natural attractions, and a relaxed maritime climate.

The Baltic Sea has many advantages over resorts by the Mediterranean Sea. It guarantees two things the kids love: a large expanse of shallow water and vast beaches of fine, clean sand.

The beaches

The best beaches for parents with young children are Swinoujscie, Krynica Morska, Tiny Pogorzelica, Dziwnow, Kolobrzeg, Jastarnia and Hel.

There are no dangerous creatures in the Polish sea, but some of the over abundant algae in places can make swimming difficult.

The Polish Baltic coast is approximately 528 kilometres (328 mi) long and extends from Świnoujście on the islands of Usedom and Wolin in the west to Krynica Morska on the Vistula Spit in the east.

For the most part, Poland has a smooth coastline, which has been shaped by the continual movement of sand by currents and winds from west to east. This continual erosion and deposition has formed cliffs, dunes, and spits, many of which have migrated landwards to close off former lagoons, such as Łebsko Lake in Słowiński National Park.

Largest spits are Hel Peninsula and the Vistula Spit, largest Polish Baltic island is Wolin and the largest port cities are Gdynia, Gdańsk, Szczecin and Świnoujście.

The main coastal resorts are Sopot, Międzyzdroje, Kołobrzeg, Łeba, Władysławowo, and the Hel Peninsula.

Jurata

Jurata is a popular seaside resort on the 35 km long Hel Peninsula, which separates the Bay of Puck from the Baltic Sea.

Jurata was established in the interwar period (1928) as a Polish sea side resort, popular especially among Varsovians. Its name comes from the Lithuanian Goddess Jūratė which in Polish is spelled as Jurata. It’s easily reachable from Tricity by train, which takes approximately one hour.

July and August are high season so make sure you book your accommodation in advance.

Międzyzdroje

Międzyzdroje is located on the western side of the Polish coast, close to the border with Germany and is often referred to as The Pearl of the Baltic.

The town is famous for (Festiwal Gwiazd) the annual Festival of Stars and attracts many Polish film and TV celebrities, who leave imprints of their hands on the Promenade of Stars inspired by the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Łeba and Ustka

Łeba and Ustka are coastal towns situated on the two opposite sides of the beautiful Słowiński National Park – famous for its “shifting dunes”, which move due to strong winds creating a desert like landscape.

Ustka is a host of the annual International Contest of Fireworks, which takes place in the middle of July and boasts two beaches connected by a pedestrianised bridge on the Słupia River, which divides the town in two.


Castles in Poland

Castles, forts & palaces

Poland is home to an enormous number of castles, Teutonic fortresses, Silesian strongholds, palaces & fortified manor houses. Unfortunately many of the great castles in Poland are in ruins or have been transformed into palaces & hotels; however there are still many left intact offering tourists a unique window into the history of Poland, it’s culture & heritage.

The Teutonic Knights

The Teutonic Knights were responsible for building the most remarkable castles in Poland and these are situated in the North East of the country.

Malbork Castle is the largest surviving Medieval castle in Europe and should be on your list of castles to visit. Other castles built by the Teutonic Knights and worth a visit are in Lidzbark Warminski and Kwidzyn.

Nicolaus Copernicus lived at Lidzbark Warminski castle for several years, and it is believed he wrote part of his De revolutionibus orbium coelestium there.

Kwidzyn contains the partially-ruined 14th century Brick Gothic Ordensburg castle of the Teutonic Order. Connected to the castle to the east is a large cathedral (built 1343-1384) containing the tombs of the bishops as well those of three Grand Masters of the Teutonic Knights. The literally outstanding feature of the castle is a sewer tower which is connected to it by a bridge. The tower used to be placed at the river which has changed its course since, leaving it on dry land.

The Kings of Poland

The Kings of Poland all resided within either Wawel Castle in Krakow or the Royal Castle in Warsaw and both of these castles are popular tourist attractions.

Eagles’ Nest fortification

Between Czestochowa and Krakow, many castles were built in the Middle Ages as part of a great Eagles’ Nest fortification; however were destroyed during the Swedish Deluge of the 1650s.

The most popular ruins in this area are the castles of Bobolice, Bolków, Olsztyn, Mirow & Ogrodzieniec. Pieskowa Skala is the only one well-preserved castle from the whole Eagles’ Nest fortification system.

Other recommended castles are located in Baranow Sandomierski, Ksiaz, Niedzica, Goluchow and ruined castle in Krzysztopor in Ujazd village.


Canoeing in Poland

Canoeing and kayaking

Canoeing and kayaking are popular leisure activities in Poland. There are almost 10,000 kilometres of rivers and lakes in the country and many of these waterways are very popular for canoeing in Poland.

The Lubuskie Lake District and the rivers of the west of Poland offer some of the best kayaking.

Four of the best rivers in Poland for kayaking and canoeing enthusiasts are the River Obra, Warta River, River Notec, and River Drawa. Other rivers suitable for canoeing and kayaking include the River Odra, River Postomia, Czarna Hancza River, Brda River and the Krutynia River.

Krutynia route

The most beautiful route is the almost two hundred kilometer long Krutynia route. The river winds its way through the land of a Thousand Lakes, among a picturesque landscape of lakes and streams. The Krutynia River is always a wonderful experience, a close encounter with lush nature, beautiful lakes and the wildlife of the Pisz Forest.

Drweca River

Another interesting Mazurian route is that of the Drweca River which is one of the clearest rivers in Poland. It is about 200 km long. It starts at Ostroda, flows through forests and wildlife reserves, and goes all the way to the Vistula River near Torun. Comfortable sites for camping are found on both riverbanks. There is an annual “International Canoe Trip on Drweca river”, which is popular among canoeists from many countries.

Experienced tourists can seek adventures along more challenging whirls and rocks of mountain rivers. Kayak trips for groups are organised on the Dunajec River, which seems to be the best choice, also because of its picturesque gorges in the Pieniny Mountains.

Polish waterways are good both for long trips as well as for one-day expeditions. One day is all it takes to sail half the Radunskie Circle or the Kowaliowy Trail in the Przemecki Natural Park. Boatmen wait for visitors on the River Krutynia and take them down the prettiest parts of the river at a good pace and with no effort. The Dunajec has its traditional raftsmen — called Flis — who can take you on a breathtaking rafting excursion.

You can join rafting trips on the Odra, from Nowa Sol, all the way to Szczecin. Or paddle your way from Bory Tucholskie to Hamburg; the route about 900 km going through Brda, Bydgoski Canal, Notec, Warta, Odra and Laba.

Mountain rivers

Kayakers looking for that special, intense experience should go down one of the three true Mountain rivers, best suited for kayaking. For example the Bialka running through Tatry and Podhale – horrifyingly cold, rushing, foamy and strewn with granite rocks.