Category: Health

Category: Health

COVID-19 Update

Treatment plan impacted by COVID-19? Our team is hard at work to provide you options that work for you.

We at Dentists in Poland understand that you are seeking dental treatment during these challenging times. We are working in partnership with our partner, Dental Departures to ensure your safe journey, treatment and outcome.

What we are seeing as ‘best practices’ globally at our partner dental clinics vary based on each country/city/province or legal authority*:

  • Temperature screening upon arrival of patients & staff
  • Sanitary gel stations at entry/exit points of the clinic/hospitals
  • Face masks for 100% of medical/dental staff at all times during work shifts
  • Requiring staff exhibiting any symptoms of Covid-19 to stay at home & self-quarantine for 14 days
  • Requiring patients to complete questionnaires prior to treatment certifying that they have not traveled to/from specific countries nor have they exhibited flu-like-symptoms
  • Banning patients from specific countries from receiving care at their dental/medical facility
  • Banning all elective dental/medical treatments; only permitting emergency dental/medical treatment

*Note – this is for informational purposes and does not constitute any medical/dental advice.  Please consult your local/state/provincial/federal/dental/medical regulatory/government body for specific Covid-19 guidelines.

We know navigating the Covid-19 quarantines is confusing so we’ve put together real-time dashboards to keep you up-to-date on inbound & outbound travel restrictions:

outbound travel restrictions 

inbound travel restrictions

Dental implants in Poland


Significant savings

Due to the cost in the UK, many Brits decide to have their dental implants in Poland where they can save up to 70% on UK prices.

Popular dental implants in Poland

All-on-4 / All-on-6 – This is a popular procedure in Poland where 4-to-6 dental implants are placed in the upper or lower jaw bone to serve as a support for a permanently fixed (non-removable) ceramic bridge made of 10-14 custom-made ceramic crowns.

What is a dental implant?

A dental implant is a surgical component that interfaces with the bone of the jaw or skull. It supports a dental prosthesis such as a crown, bridge, denture, facial prosthesis or to act as an orthodontic anchor. It is a fairly complicated and lengthy procedure requiring a minimum of two visits so you should bear this in mind when having your dental implants in Poland.

Osseointegration

The basis for modern dental implants is a biologic process called osseointegration, in which materials such as titanium form an intimate bond to bone.

The implant fixture is first placed so that it is likely to osseointegrate, then a dental prosthetic is added. A variable amount of healing time is required for osseointegration before either the dental prosthetic (a tooth, bridge or denture) is attached to the implant or an abutment is placed which will hold a dental prosthetic.

Success or failure

Success or failure of implants depends on the health of the person receiving the treatment, drugs which affect the chances of osseointegration, and the health of the tissues in the mouth.

The amount of stress that will be put on the implant and fixture during normal function is also evaluated. Planning the position and number of implants is key to the long-term health of the prosthetic since bio-mechanical forces created during chewing can be significant.

Positioning

The position of implants is determined by the position and angle of adjacent teeth, by lab simulations or by using computed tomography with CAD/CAM simulations and surgical guides called stents. The prerequisites for long-term success of osseointegrated dental implants are healthy bone and gingiva. Since both can atrophy after tooth extraction, pre-prosthetic procedures such as sinus lifts or gingival grafts are sometimes required to recreate ideal bone and gingiva.

Fixed or removable

The final prosthetic can be either fixed, where a person cannot remove the denture or teeth from their mouth, or removable, where they can remove the prosthetic. In each case an abutment is attached to the implant fixture. Where the prosthetic is fixed, the crown, bridge or denture is fixed to the abutment either with lag screws or with dental cement. Where the prosthetic is removable, a corresponding adapter is placed in the prosthetic so that the two pieces can be secured together.

Risks & complications

The risks and complications related to implant therapy divide into those that occur during surgery (such as excessive bleeding or nerve injury), those that occur in the first six months (such as infection and failure to osseointegrate) and those that occur long-term (such as peri-implantitis and mechanical failures).

In the presence of healthy tissues, a well-integrated implant with appropriate biomechanical loads can have 5-year plus survival rates from 93 to 98 percent and 10 to 15 year lifespans for the prosthetic teeth. Long-term studies show a 16- to 20-year success (implants surviving without complications or revisions) between 52% and 76%, with complications occurring up to 48% of the time.

Medical uses

The primary use of dental implants is to support dental prosthetics. Modern dental implants make use of osseointegration, the biologic process where bone fuses tightly to the surface of specific materials such as titanium and some ceramics. The integration of implant and bone can support physical loads for decades without failure.

For individual tooth replacement, an implant abutment is first secured to the implant with an abutment screw. A crown (the dental prosthesis) is then connected to the abutment with dental cement, a small screw, or fused with the abutment as one piece during fabrication. Dental implants, in the same way, can also be used to retain a multiple tooth dental prosthesis either in the form of a fixed bridge or removable dentures.

An implant supported bridge (or fixed denture) is a group of teeth secured to dental implants so the prosthetic cannot be removed by the user. Bridges typically connect to more than one implant and may also connect to teeth as anchor points. Typically the number of teeth will outnumber the anchor points with the teeth that are directly over the implants referred to as abutments and those between abutments referred to as pontics.

Implant supported bridges attach to implant abutments in the same way as a single tooth implant replacement. A fixed bridge may replace as few as two teeth (also known as a fixed partial denture) and may extend to replace an entire arch of teeth (also known as a fixed full denture). In both cases, the prosthesis is said to be fixed because it cannot be removed by the denture wearer.

A removable implant supported denture (also an implant supported overdenture) is a type of dental prosthesis which is not permanently fixed in place. The dental prosthesis can be disconnected from the implant abutments with finger pressure by the wearer. To enable this, the abutment is shaped as a small connector (a button, ball, bar or magnet) which can be connected to analogous adapters in the underside of the dental prosthesis. Facial prosthetics, used to correct facial deformities (e.g. from cancer treatment or injuries) can use connections to implants placed in the facial bones. Depending on the situation the implant may be used to retain either a fixed or removable prosthetic that replaces part of the face.

TADs

In orthodontics, small diameter dental implants, referred to as Temporary Anchorage Devices (or TADs) can assist tooth movement by creating anchor points from which forces can be generated. For teeth to move, a force must be applied to them in the direction of the desired movement. The force stimulates cells in the periodontal ligament to cause bone remodeling, removing bone in the direction of travel of the tooth and adding it to the space created. In order to generate a force on a tooth, an anchor point (something that will not move) is needed.

Since implants do not have a periodontal ligament, and bone remodelling will not be stimulated when tension is applied, they are ideal anchor points in orthodontics. Typically, implants designed for orthodontic movement are small and do not fully osseointegrate, allowing easy removal following treatment.

Composition

A typical conventional implant consists of a titanium screw (resembling a tooth root) with a roughened or smooth surface. The majority of dental implants are made out of commercially pure titanium, which is available in four grades depending upon the amount of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and iron contained.

Implantologist in Poland

There are many dental clinics in Poland that specialise in dental implants. To begin your search, click on the button below.

FAQs about Dental Implants

How much are dental implants in Poland?

Prices vary from clinic to clinic; however as a general guide: A single tooth implant in Poland will cost from £550, the cost in the UK is around £2,000. Full mouth implants in the UK are £7,000 – £28,000, in Poland the cost is £4,000 to £9,000.

What are All-on-4 dental implants?

All-on-4 is a procedure where 4 dental implants, depending on bone availability (i.e. volume, density, etc.) are placed in the upper or lower jaw bone to serve as a support for a permanently fixed ceramic bridge made of 10-14 custom-made ceramic crowns.

How much do All-on-4-dental implants cost in Poland?

All-on-4 dental implants cost from £5200 – £7000 in Poland. In the UK, the cost is from £9500 – £16000.

Are dental implants removable?

The final prosthetic can be either fixed, where a person cannot remove the denture or teeth from their mouth, or removable, where they can remove the prosthetic.

What are the risks with dental implants?

The risks and complications related to implant therapy divide into those that occur during surgery (such as excessive bleeding or nerve injury), those that occur in the first six months (such as infection and failure to osseointegrate) and those that occur long-term (such as peri-implantitis and mechanical failures).

How long do dental implants last?

In the presence of healthy tissues, a well-integrated implant with appropriate biomechanical loads can have 5-year plus survival rates from 93 to 98 percent and 10 to 15 year lifespans for the prosthetic teeth. Long-term studies show a 16- to 20-year success (implants surviving without complications or revisions) between 52% and 76%, with complications occurring up to 48% of the time. Many dentists conservatively estimate that implants will last about 25 years.

What is osseointegration?

The basis for modern dental implants is a biologic process called osseointegration, in which materials such as titanium form an intimate bond to bone. The implant fixture is first placed so that it is likely to osseointegrate, then a dental prosthetic is added. A variable amount of healing time is required for osseointegration before either the dental prosthetic (a tooth, bridge or denture) is attached to the implant or an abutment is placed which will hold a dental prosthetic.


Hazards in modern dentistry


It is not just one-way pain!

A lot of people don’t like going to the dentist, it usually involves paying quite a lot of money for pain! However, it is not just one-way, there are hazards in modern dentistry and dentists are prone to many health problems. They often spend a considerable portion of their career in pain and discomfort.

The obvious occupational hazards are exposure to radiation, exposure to dangerous substances & sharps injuries. In addition, dentists also suffer from musculoskeletal problems & stress.

Musculoskeletal problems

Musculoskeletal problems are prevalent among dental professionals with problems beginning as early on as dental school.

The problems arise from the nature of the job: focusing on fine procedures which require a close visual field and sustained posture for long periods of time.

Repetitive work, the need to maintain steady hands, and spending most of the day with an awkward posture can lead to musculoskeletal pain in various sites. The lower back is commonly affected, as well as the upper back, shoulders and neck.

Stress

One of the key hazards in modern dentistry is stress. Recent studies show that dentists are at higher risk of stress-related incidences such as suicide, cardiovascular disease and mental health issues.

Potential reasons include work confinement, working with anxious patients, time pressures, complex treatment and personality traits within dentists themselves (the need for perfection, attention to detail, high expectations of themselves and others).

Training

Education of dentists in Poland is high and regulation is strict. To become a qualified dentist in Poland, students must first undergo five years of training at university. After completing their five-year course, graduates begin a 12-month work experience program. After this, they can then think about specialising – so the stress begins early!