Category: Dentistry

Category: Dentistry

Dentistry in Poland – FAQs

What is the Dentists in Poland website about?

We provide detailed information about general and cosmetic dentistry in Poland. Our directory contains details about English speaking dentists in popular destinations in Poland including their specialisations and prices. We also provide Poland tourist information.

Is Dentists in Poland a dental clinic?

The team includes Dr. Joanna Orłowska, a dentist with 13 years experience working in dental surgeries in Warsaw  so yes, we can and we do arrange dental treatment. The purpose of this website however; is to provide a directory of dentists in Poland so that you; the user – can find the ideal dental clinic for your particular circumstances e.g. budget & location. If you would like us to arrange dental treatment for you, please use the form on our contact page and provide us with as much information as you can.

Is Dentists in Poland a travel agent?

No, we are not a travel agent and we do not get involved with flight bookings, hotel bookings or travel arrangements. Our main sponsor Love Poland provides detailed information about coming to Poland as a tourist and in addition to this, we also provide lots of tourist information on this website. We are happy to advise you about various aspects of your trip including dental treatment, costs & things to do and see when you are here etc. Many of the dental clinics that we work with here in Poland are happy to help with you with airport transfers, accommodation, tours to local tourist attractions & advice about restaurants etc. Some clinics even provide free or highly discounted hotel accommodation and full concierge services.

What is dental tourism?

Dental tourism is a subset of the sector known as medical tourism. It involves individuals seeking dental care outside their local healthcare systems and may be accompanied by a holiday.

Why is Poland a good dental tourism destination?

There are many reasons why travelling to Poland for your dental treatment is a great idea, here’s our Top 7.

What is the quality of dental treatment like in Poland?

Dentistry in Poland is advanced and the education of dentists is high and regulation is strict. To become a qualified dentist in Poland, students must first undergo five years of training at university. After completing their five-year course, graduates begin a 12-month work experience program. During this time they are only able to perform treatments under supervision. Following this, they must pass another exam in order to become fully qualified. The dentists listed on this website are highly experienced and take pride in offering unbeatable customer service and the highest standard of treatment & care to their patients. The dental clinics we recommend are modern & equipped with the latest dentistry technologies. Many clinics are ISO 9001 certified.

How much does dental treatment cost in Poland?

Going to the dentist in the UK is expensive with average costs of just one implant being £2,400 and one porcelain veneer starting at £500. If you require a lot of dental work, the final price can run into tens of thousands of £s. Dental tourism to Poland exists for one main reason, dental treatment is significantly cheaper here. A dental implant with a crown will typically cost around £900 and other treatments can be up to 70% cheaper even with the extra cost of flights and accommodation to consider. For further information, please check out our price comparisons page.

Where are the best dental clinics in Poland?

The best dental clinics are located in the major cities, such as Warsaw, Kraków, Gdańsk, Wrocław & Poznan. These cities are also popular tourist destinations so they are ideal for dental tourism.

Do the dental clinics in Poland offer a guarantee?

This varies from clinic to clinic. Many provide a long dental guarantee on all treatments. Patients get up to 5 years on crowns or bridges and up to a lifetime on implants.

What types of dental treatment can I get in Poland?

We provide introductions with dentists and dental surgeries who offer a full range of general and cosmetic dental treatment in Poland including dental hygienist services, dental implants, root canal treatment, emergency dental appointments and treatments under sedation. For further information, please visit our Dental Treatment page.

What is a dental implant?

A dental implant is a surgical component that interfaces with the bone of the jaw or skull. It supports a dental prosthesis such as a crown, bridge, denture, facial prosthesis or to act as an orthodontic anchor. For further information, please read our Dental Implants post.

What are All-on-4 and All-on-6 dental implants?

This is a popular procedure in Poland where 4-to-6 dental implants are placed in the upper or lower jaw bone to serve as a support for a permanently fixed (non-removable) ceramic bridge made of 10-14 custom-made ceramic crowns.

Is it easy to get to Poland?

Most of Europe’s major airlines fly to and from Poland. Poland’s national carrier is LOT and there are a number of budget airlines that fly to Poland including WizzAirEasyJetEurowings, Norwegian and Ryanair.

What can I do in Poland?

Poland is a very popular tourist destination, particularly the main cities of Warsaw, Krakow Gdansk where many of our recommended dental surgeries are located. However there is much more to Poland than just the amazing cities. From Poland’s lake district Masuria with over 2,000 lakes to true wilderness areas like The Bialowieza Forest to the stunning Tatra Mountains – you will find that Poland has something to offer every visitor. With large natural forest, Poland is a bird-watcher’s paradise. Northern Poland caters for beach lovers & Poland is home to spectacular mountain ranges, the world’s oldest operating salt mines, fantastic landscapes, caves, historical monuments and castles & much more.

What is Root Canal Treatment?

Root canal treatment is a treatment aimed at the infected pulp of a tooth which results in the elimination of infection and the protection of the decontaminated tooth from future microbial invasion. Root canals, and their associated pulp chamber, are the physical hollows within a tooth that are naturally inhabited by nerve tissue, blood vessels and other cellular entities. Together, these items constitute the dental pulp. The treatment involves the removal of these structures, the subsequent shaping, cleaning, and decontamination of the hollows with small files and irrigating solutions, and the obturation (filling) of the decontaminated canals. For further information, please read our Root Canal Treatment post.

What does a Dental Hygienist do?

A dental hygienist or oral hygienist is a licensed dental professional, registered with a dental association or regulatory body within their country of practice. In Poland, that is The Polish Academy for Dental Prophylaxis. Once registered, hygienists are primary healthcare professionals who work independently of or alongside dentists and other dental professionals to provide full oral health care. For further information, please read our Dental Hygienist post.

How can I advertise on Dentists in Poland?

Many opportunities exist to advertise on Dentists in Poland. Please visit our advertise page for further information.

Root canal treatment

What is it?

Root canal treatment is a treatment aimed at the infected pulp of a tooth which results in the elimination of infection and the protection of the decontaminated tooth from future microbial invasion.

Root canals / Dental pulp

Root canals, and their associated pulp chamber, are the physical hollows within a tooth that are naturally inhabited by nerve tissue, blood vessels and other cellular entities. Together, these items constitute the dental pulp.

The treatment

The treatment involves the removal of these structures, the subsequent shaping, cleaning, and decontamination of the hollows with small files and irrigating solutions, and the obturation (filling) of the decontaminated canals.

Filling of the cleaned and decontaminated canals is done with an inert filling such as gutta-percha and typically a eugenol-based cement. Epoxy resin is employed to bind gutta-percha in some root canal procedures.



The procedure is often complicated, depending on circumstances, and may involve multiple visits over a period of weeks. If you are considering having this treatment completed in Poland, you should understand how many visits will be required in your particular treatment.

Usually the length of time required is 60-90 minutes per session (depending on the tooth and the number of canals) with 1 to 3 treatments required. Further information can be found here – Dental treatment

Root canal treatment procedure

Before root canal treatment is carried out, a correct diagnosis of the dental pulp and the surrounding tissues is required. This allows the dentist to choose the most appropriate treatment option, allowing preservation and longevity of the tooth and surrounding tissues.

Root canal treatment enables the endodontist to help preserve the longevity and function of the tooth. The treatment option chosen involves taking into account the expected prognosis of the tooth, as well as the patient’s wishes.

A full history is required (which includes the patient’s symptoms and medical history), along with a clinical examination (both inside and outside the mouth), and the use of diagnostic tests.

In the situation that a tooth is considered so threatened (because of decay, cracking, etc.) that future infection is considered likely or inevitable, a pulpectomy (removal of the pulp tissue) is advisable to prevent such infection. Usually, some inflammation and/or infection is already present within or below the tooth.

To cure the infection and save the tooth, the dentist drills into the pulp chamber and removes the infected pulp and then drills the nerve out of the root canal(s) with long needle-shaped hand instruments known as files (H files and K files).

Final restoration

Molars and premolars that have had root canal therapy should be protected with a crown that covers the cusps of the tooth. This is because the access made into the root canal system removes a significant amount of tooth structure. Molars and premolars are the primary teeth used in chewing and will almost certainly fracture in the future without cuspal coverage.

Endodontology in Poland

There are many dentists who specialise in this type of treatment in Poland. To begin your search, please click on the button below.



FAQs about Root Canal Treatment

What is Root Canal Treatment?

Root canal treatment is a treatment aimed at the infected pulp of a tooth which results in the elimination of infection and the protection of the decontaminated tooth from future microbial invasion. Root canals, and their associated pulp chamber, are the physical hollows within a tooth that are naturally inhabited by nerve tissue, blood vessels and other cellular entities. Together, these items constitute the dental pulp. The treatment involves the removal of these structures, the subsequent shaping, cleaning, and decontamination of the hollows with small files and irrigating solutions, and the obturation (filling) of the decontaminated canals.

How long does Root Canal Treatment take?

The procedure is often complicated, depending on circumstances, and may involve multiple visits over a period of weeks. Usually the length of time required is 60-90 minutes per session (depending on the tooth and the number of canals) with 1 to 3 treatments required.

Why is Root Canal Treatment necessary?

Root canal treatment enables the endodontist to help preserve the longevity and function of the tooth.

How much does Root Canal Treatment cost in Poland?

Root Canal Treatment costs from £115 (1 x root) to £175 (3 x roots). Difficult endodontic cases plus microscope will cost an extra £20 to £40 per root canal.


Dental implants in Poland

Significant savings

Due to the cost in the UK, many Brits decide to have their dental implants in Poland where they can save up to 70% on UK prices.

Popular dental implants in Poland

All-on-4 / All-on-6 – This is a popular procedure in Poland where 4-to-6 dental implants are placed in the upper or lower jaw bone to serve as a support for a permanently fixed (non-removable) ceramic bridge made of 10-14 custom-made ceramic crowns.

What is a dental implant?

A dental implant is a surgical component that interfaces with the bone of the jaw or skull. It supports a dental prosthesis such as a crown, bridge, denture, facial prosthesis or to act as an orthodontic anchor. It is a fairly complicated and lengthy procedure requiring a minimum of two visits so you should bear this in mind when having your dental implants in Poland.

Osseointegration

The basis for modern dental implants is a biologic process called osseointegration, in which materials such as titanium form an intimate bond to bone.

The implant fixture is first placed so that it is likely to osseointegrate, then a dental prosthetic is added. A variable amount of healing time is required for osseointegration before either the dental prosthetic (a tooth, bridge or denture) is attached to the implant or an abutment is placed which will hold a dental prosthetic.



Success or failure

Success or failure of implants depends on the health of the person receiving the treatment, drugs which affect the chances of osseointegration, and the health of the tissues in the mouth.

The amount of stress that will be put on the implant and fixture during normal function is also evaluated. Planning the position and number of implants is key to the long-term health of the prosthetic since biomechanical forces created during chewing can be significant.

Positioning

The position of implants is determined by the position and angle of adjacent teeth, by lab simulations or by using computed tomography with CAD/CAM simulations and surgical guides called stents. The prerequisites for long-term success of osseointegrated dental implants are healthy bone and gingiva. Since both can atrophy after tooth extraction, pre-prosthetic procedures such as sinus lifts or gingival grafts are sometimes required to recreate ideal bone and gingiva.

Fixed or removable

The final prosthetic can be either fixed, where a person cannot remove the denture or teeth from their mouth, or removable, where they can remove the prosthetic. In each case an abutment is attached to the implant fixture. Where the prosthetic is fixed, the crown, bridge or denture is fixed to the abutment either with lag screws or with dental cement. Where the prosthetic is removable, a corresponding adapter is placed in the prosthetic so that the two pieces can be secured together.



Risks & complications

The risks and complications related to implant therapy divide into those that occur during surgery (such as excessive bleeding or nerve injury), those that occur in the first six months (such as infection and failure to osseointegrate) and those that occur long-term (such as peri-implantitis and mechanical failures).

In the presence of healthy tissues, a well-integrated implant with appropriate biomechanical loads can have 5-year plus survival rates from 93 to 98 percent and 10 to 15 year lifespans for the prosthetic teeth. Long-term studies show a 16- to 20-year success (implants surviving without complications or revisions) between 52% and 76%, with complications occurring up to 48% of the time.

Medical uses

The primary use of dental implants is to support dental prosthetics. Modern dental implants make use of osseointegration, the biologic process where bone fuses tightly to the surface of specific materials such as titanium and some ceramics. The integration of implant and bone can support physical loads for decades without failure.

For individual tooth replacement, an implant abutment is first secured to the implant with an abutment screw. A crown (the dental prosthesis) is then connected to the abutment with dental cement, a small screw, or fused with the abutment as one piece during fabrication. Dental implants, in the same way, can also be used to retain a multiple tooth dental prosthesis either in the form of a fixed bridge or removable dentures.

An implant supported bridge (or fixed denture) is a group of teeth secured to dental implants so the prosthetic cannot be removed by the user. Bridges typically connect to more than one implant and may also connect to teeth as anchor points. Typically the number of teeth will outnumber the anchor points with the teeth that are directly over the implants referred to as abutments and those between abutments referred to as pontics.

Implant supported bridges attach to implant abutments in the same way as a single tooth implant replacement. A fixed bridge may replace as few as two teeth (also known as a fixed partial denture) and may extend to replace an entire arch of teeth (also known as a fixed full denture). In both cases, the prosthesis is said to be fixed because it cannot be removed by the denture wearer.

A removable implant supported denture (also an implant supported overdenture) is a type of dental prosthesis which is not permanently fixed in place. The dental prosthesis can be disconnected from the implant abutments with finger pressure by the wearer. To enable this, the abutment is shaped as a small connector (a button, ball, bar or magnet) which can be connected to analogous adapters in the underside of the dental prosthesis. Facial prosthetics, used to correct facial deformities (e.g. from cancer treatment or injuries) can use connections to implants placed in the facial bones. Depending on the situation the implant may be used to retain either a fixed or removable prosthetic that replaces part of the face.

TADs

In orthodontics, small diameter dental implants, referred to as Temporary Anchorage Devices (or TADs) can assist tooth movement by creating anchor points from which forces can be generated. For teeth to move, a force must be applied to them in the direction of the desired movement. The force stimulates cells in the periodontal ligament to cause bone remodeling, removing bone in the direction of travel of the tooth and adding it to the space created. In order to generate a force on a tooth, an anchor point (something that will not move) is needed.

Since implants do not have a periodontal ligament, and bone remodelling will not be stimulated when tension is applied, they are ideal anchor points in orthodontics. Typically, implants designed for orthodontic movement are small and do not fully osseointegrate, allowing easy removal following treatment.

Composition

A typical conventional implant consists of a titanium screw (resembling a tooth root) with a roughened or smooth surface. The majority of dental implants are made out of commercially pure titanium, which is available in four grades depending upon the amount of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and iron contained.

Implantologist in Poland

There are many dental clinics in Poland that specialise in dental implants. To begin your search, click on the button below.



FAQs about Dental Implants

How much are dental implants in Poland?

Prices vary from clinic to clinic; however as a general guide: A single tooth implant in Poland will cost from £550, the cost in the UK is around £2,000. Full mouth implants in the UK are £7,000 – £28,000, in Poland the cost is £4,000 to £9,000.

What are All-on-4 dental implants?

All-on-4 is a procedure where 4 dental implants, depending on bone availability (i.e. volume, density, etc.) are placed in the upper or lower jaw bone to serve as a support for a permanently fixed ceramic bridge made of 10-14 custom-made ceramic crowns.

How much do All-on-4-dental implants cost in Poland?

All-on-4 dental implants cost from £5200 – £7000 in Poland. In the UK, the cost is from £9500 – £16000.

Are dental implants removable?

The final prosthetic can be either fixed, where a person cannot remove the denture or teeth from their mouth, or removable, where they can remove the prosthetic.

What are the risks with dental implants?

The risks and complications related to implant therapy divide into those that occur during surgery (such as excessive bleeding or nerve injury), those that occur in the first six months (such as infection and failure to osseointegrate) and those that occur long-term (such as peri-implantitis and mechanical failures).

How long do dental implants last?

In the presence of healthy tissues, a well-integrated implant with appropriate biomechanical loads can have 5-year plus survival rates from 93 to 98 percent and 10 to 15 year lifespans for the prosthetic teeth. Long-term studies show a 16- to 20-year success (implants surviving without complications or revisions) between 52% and 76%, with complications occurring up to 48% of the time. Many dentists conservatively estimate that implants will last about 25 years.

What is osseointegration?

The basis for modern dental implants is a biologic process called osseointegration, in which materials such as titanium form an intimate bond to bone. The implant fixture is first placed so that it is likely to osseointegrate, then a dental prosthetic is added. A variable amount of healing time is required for osseointegration before either the dental prosthetic (a tooth, bridge or denture) is attached to the implant or an abutment is placed which will hold a dental prosthetic.


What is dentistry?

The term

The term dentistry comes from dentist, which comes from French dentiste, which comes from the French and Latin words for tooth.

A branch of medicine

Dentistry, also known as Dental and Oral Medicine, is a branch of medicine. It consists of the study, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of diseases, disorders, and conditions of the oral cavity. These are commonly in the dentition but also the oral mucosa, and of adjacent and related structures and tissues. Particularly in the maxillofacial (jaw and facial) area.

Although primarily associated with teeth among the general public, the field of dentistry or dental medicine is not limited to teeth. It includes other aspects of the craniofacial complex. This includes the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and other supporting, muscular, lymphatic, nervous, vascular, and anatomical structures.

Stomatology

Dentistry is often also understood to subsume the now largely defunct medical speciality of stomatology (the study of the mouth and its disorders and diseases). The two terms are used interchangeably in certain regions particularly in Poland.

Dental treatments are carried out by a dental team, which often consists of a dentist and dental auxiliaries (dental assistants, dental hygienists, dental technicians, as well as dental therapists).


Video: A typical dental studio in Poland


History

The history of dentistry is almost as ancient as the history of humanity and civilization with the earliest evidence dating from 7000 BC. Remains from the early Harappan periods of the Indus Valley Civilization (c. 3300 BC) show evidence of teeth having been drilled dating back 9,000 years.

Education of dentists in Poland is high and regulation is strict. To become a qualified dentist in Poland, students must first undergo five years of training at university. After completing their five-year course, graduates begin a 12-month work experience program. During this time they are only able to perform treatments under supervision. Following this, they must pass another exam in order to become fully qualified.

For information about dentistry in Poland, The Polish Chamber of Physicians and Dentists is a good source!


The history of dentistry

Dentistry is older than you think

The history of dentistry is fascinating. During the time of pre-agricultural societies, tooth decay was rare. The advent of farming 10,000 years ago correlated with an increase in tooth decay (cavities).

An infected tooth from Italy partially cleaned with flint tools, between 13,820 and 14,160 years old, represents the oldest known example of preventative dentistry. A 2017 study also suggests that 130,000 years ago the Neanderthals already used rudimentary dentistry tools.

Indus Valley Civilisation

The Indus Valley Civilisation (IVC) has yielded evidence of dentistry being practised as far back as 7000 BC. An IVC site in Mehrgarh indicates that this form of dentistry involved curing tooth related disorders with bow drills operated, perhaps, by skilled bead crafters. The reconstruction of this ancient form of dentistry showed that the methods used were reliable and effective.

The earliest dental filling, made of beeswax, was discovered in Slovenia and dates from 6500 years ago. Dentistry was practiced in prehistoric Malta, as evidenced by a skull which had an abscess lanced from the root of a tooth dating back to around 2500 BC.

An ancient Sumerian text describes a “tooth worm” as the cause of dental caries. Evidence of this belief has also been found in ancient India, Egypt, Japan, and China. The legend of the worm is also found in the writings of Homer, and as late as the 14th century AD the surgeon Guy de Chauliac still promoted the belief that worms cause tooth decay.

Hippocrates & Aristotle

Ancient Greek scholars Hippocrates and Aristotle wrote about dentistry. This included the eruption pattern of teeth, treating decayed teeth and gum disease, extracting teeth with forceps, and using wires to stabilize loose teeth and fractured jaws.

Historically, dental extractions have been used to treat a variety of illnesses. During the Middle Ages and throughout the 19th century, dentistry was not a profession in itself, and often dental procedures were performed by barbers or general physicians. Barbers usually limited their practice to extracting teeth which alleviated pain and associated chronic tooth infection.

Dental instruments

Instruments used for dental extractions date back several centuries. In the 14th century, Guy de Chauliac most probably invented the dental pelican (resembling a pelican’s beak) which was used to perform dental extractions up until the late 18th century. The pelican was replaced by the dental key which, in turn, was replaced by modern forceps in the 19th century.

Tooth cleaning and decay

Since before recorded history, a variety of oral hygiene measures have been used for teeth cleaning. This has been verified by various excavations done throughout the world, in which chew sticks, tree twigs, bird feathers, animal bones and porcupine quills have been found. In historic times, different forms of tooth cleaning tools have been used.

Indian medicine (Ayurveda) has used the neem tree, or daatun, and its products to create teeth cleaning twigs and similar products; a person chews one end of the neem twig until it somewhat resembles the bristles of a toothbrush, and then uses it to brush the teeth.

In the Muslim world, the miswak, or siwak, made from a twig or root, has antiseptic properties and has been widely used since the Islamic Golden Age. Rubbing baking soda or chalk against the teeth was also common; however, this can have negative side effects over time.

Dentures

As early as the 7th century BC, Etruscans in northern Italy made partial dentures out of human or other animal teeth fastened together with gold bands. The Romans had likely borrowed this technique by the 5th century BC.

Wooden full dentures were invented in Japan around the early 16th century. Softened bees wax was inserted into the patient’s mouth to create an impression, which was then filled with harder bees wax. Wooden dentures were then meticulously carved based on that model. The earliest of these dentures were entirely wooden, but later versions used natural human teeth or sculpted pagodite, ivory, or animal horn for the teeth.

The first porcelain dentures were made around 1770 by Alexis Duchâteau.

History of dentistry – Images

While going to the dentist is something that many people dread, our fears must be nothing compared to what people in the past had to contend with. The history of dentistry indeed reveals some downright terrifying practices. Check out these images

Did you enjoy this article? We hope so. Find more interesting articles about dentistry on our Information page.

 


Dental treatment explained

Major public health problems

Dental treatment usually encompasses practices related to the oral cavity and is often referred to as dentistry. According to the World Health Organisation, oral diseases are major public health problems. This is due to their high incidence and prevalence across the globe, with the disadvantaged affected more than other socio-economic groups.

Dental treatment

The majority of dental treatment in Poland carried out today is to prevent or treat the two most common oral diseases. These are dental caries (tooth decay) and periodontal disease (gum disease or pyorrhea). Common treatments involve the restoration of teeth, extraction or surgical removal of teeth, scaling and root planing and endodontic root canal treatment.

Dental treatment in Poland

Education of dentists in Poland is high and regulation is strict. To become a qualified dentist in Poland, students must first undergo five years of training at university. After completing their five-year course, graduates begin a 12-month work experience program. During this time they are only able to perform treatments under supervision. Following this, they must pass another exam in order to become fully qualified.

By nature of their general training they can carry out the majority of dental treatments such as restorative (fillings, crowns, bridges), prosthetic (dentures), endodontic (root canal) therapy, periodontal (gum) therapy, and extraction of teeth. In addition to this – performing examinations, radiographs (x-rays), and diagnosis. Dentists can also prescribe medications such as antibiotics, sedatives, and any other drugs used in patient management.

Many dentists undertake dental specialties training after their qualification such as Implantology which is replacing extracted teeth with dental implants.

Dentists also encourage prevention of oral diseases through proper hygiene and regular, twice yearly, checkups for professional cleaning and evaluation.

Oral infections and inflammations may affect overall health and conditions in the oral cavity may be indicative of systemic diseases, such as osteoporosis, diabetes, celiac disease or cancer.

See further information about the range of dental treatment available.

Oral-Systemic Health

Many studies have also shown that gum disease is associated with an increased risk of diabetes, heart disease, and preterm birth. The concept that oral health can affect systemic health and disease is referred to as “oral-systemic health”.


Dental specialties

Dental qualification in Poland

To become a qualified dentist in Poland, students must first undergo five years of training at university prior to beginning dental specialties training.

After completing their five-year course, graduates begin a 12-month work experience program. During this time they are only able to perform treatments under supervision.

Following this, they must pass another exam in order to become fully qualified.

Dental specialties training

Many dentists undertake dental specialties training after their qualification. Examples of specialities include:

  • Anesthesiology – How to relieve pain through advanced use of local and general anesthetic techniques.
  • Dental public health – Epidemiology and social health policies relevant to oral health.
  • Conservative dentistry and endodontics – Restoring the tooth form and function when destructed by carious and non carious lesions affecting the teeth, before involvement of pulp or root canal is termed as conservative dentistry. When the root canal are involved, the speciality is known as endodontics.
  • Endodontics (also called endodontology) – Root canal therapy and study of diseases of the dental pulp and periapical tissues.
  • Forensic odontology – Gathering and use of dental evidence in law. This may be performed by any dentist with experience or training in this field. The function of the forensic dentist is primarily documentation and verification of identity.
  • Geriatric dentistry or Geriodontics – The delivery of dental care to older adults involving the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of problems associated with normal aging and age-related diseases as part of an interdisciplinary team with other health care professionals.
  • Oral and maxillofacial pathology – The study, diagnosis, and sometimes the treatment of oral and maxillofacial related diseases.
  • Oral and maxillofacial radiology – Radiologic interpretation of oral and maxillofacial diseases.
  • Maxillofacial surgery (also called oral surgery) – Extractions, implants, and surgery of the jaws, mouth and face.
  • Oral biology – Research in dental and craniofacial biology.
  • Implantology – Replacing extracted teeth with dental implants.
  • Oral medicine – The clinical evaluation and diagnosis of oral mucosal diseases.
  • Orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics – Straightening of teeth and modification of midface and mandibular growth.
  • Pediatric dentistry (also called pedodontics) – Dentistry for children.
  • Periodontology (also called periodontics) – The study and treatment of diseases of the periodontium (non-surgical and surgical) as well as placement and maintenance of dental implants.
  • Prosthodontics (also called prosthetic dentistry) – Dentures, bridges and the restoration of implants. Some prosthodontists further their training in “oral and maxillofacial prosthodontics”, which is the discipline concerned with the replacement of missing facial structures, such as ears, eyes, noses, etc.
  • Special needs dentistry (also called special care dentistry) – Dentistry for those with developmental and acquired disabilities.
  • Veterinary dentistry, a speciality of veterinary medicine – The field of dentistry applied to the care of animals.

The training to become a specialist dentist in Poland is very high and does not come without cost to health and well-being. Dentists are prone to many health problems and often spend a considerable portion of their career in pain and discomfort. Read this article about the Hazards in modern dentistry for further information.

For information about dentistry in Poland, The Polish Chamber of Physicians and Dentists is a good source!


Hazards in modern dentistry

It is not just one-way pain!

A lot of people don’t like going to the dentist, it usually involves paying quite a lot of money for pain! However, it is not just one-way, there are hazards in modern dentistry and dentists are prone to many health problems. They often spend a considerable portion of their career in pain and discomfort.

The obvious occupational hazards are exposure to radiation, exposure to dangerous substances & sharps injuries. In addition, dentists also suffer from musculoskeletal problems & stress.

Musculoskeletal problems

Musculoskeletal problems are prevalent among dental professionals with problems beginning as early on as dental school.

The problems arise from the nature of the job: focusing on fine procedures which require a close visual field and sustained posture for long periods of time.

Repetitive work, the need to maintain steady hands, and spending most of the day with an awkward posture can lead to musculoskeletal pain in various sites. The lower back is commonly affected, as well as the upper back, shoulders and neck.

Stress

One of the key hazards in modern dentistry is stress. Recent studies show that dentists are at higher risk of stress-related incidences such as suicide, cardiovascular disease and mental health issues.

Potential reasons include work confinement, working with anxious patients, time pressures, complex treatment and personality traits within dentists themselves (the need for perfection, attention to detail, high expectations of themselves and others).

Training

Education of dentists in Poland is high and regulation is strict. To become a qualified dentist in Poland, students must first undergo five years of training at university. After completing their five-year course, graduates begin a 12-month work experience program. After this, they can then think about specialising – so the stress begins early!

There are many articles online dealing with this topic should you wish further information.